explore-blog:

Brilliant: Open Culture digs up the perfect Japanese word for our “guilt pile” of unread materials. Best approached with another untranslatable Eastern concept, the Chinese wu-wei.

explore-blog:

For Hemingway’s birthday, his timeless advice to aspiring writers

theparisreview:

“I want my translation to be something impossible yet extant, something existing on the border of two utterly incompatible worlds, and yet to be a bridge between those worlds. I want the reader of the English version to feel the same shock I felt when reading the original. I don’t want to make it easy or acceptable, or to over-domesticate the text. There is an incredible poetry in the Hungarian language. Sometimes it’s infinitely gentle, sometimes it’s savage poetry.”

An interview with translator Ottilie Mulzet on László Krasznahorkai.

Love this—I always wonder at the art of translating great books…

fastcompany:

Kids Need A Flashlight To Read This Adorable Pop-up Book

Motion Silhouette tells a story through its shadows.

Reading by flashlight when you’re supposed to be asleep is practically a rite of passage for kids. An adorable new children’s book celebrates that tradition.

Read More>

huffingtonpost:

Beachfront libraries are pretty much the best idea ever. Find out where all these beachfront libraries are here. 

Maybe beachfront bookstores…

theparisreview:

“I think that the difference right now between good art and bad art is that the good artists are the people who are, in one way or another, creating, out of deep and honest concern, a vision of life in the twentieth century that is worth pursuing. And the bad artists, of whom there are many, are whining or moaning or staring, because it’s fashionable, into the dark abyss.” —John Gardner, born on this day in 1933

(Source: clroff1)

oupacademic:

Very Short Fact: On this day in 1940, Winston Churchill gave his “Finest Hour” speech.

Without what the Greeks called kairos—the opportune moment—even the most technically brilliant speech will fall flat. As Aristotle suggested, the art of rhetoric lies in identifying the opportunities presented by the situation at hand, not in the sterile combination of figures of speech for their own sake.

[p. 33, Rhetoric: A Very Short Introduction, by Richard Toye].

Like the Very Short Introductions on Facebook for more from the series.

Image credit: Winston Churchill during the General Election Campaign in 1945. Public domain via Wikimedia Commons.

Ethos, logos, pathos—and KAIROS!

explore-blog:

In admonishing against their usage, Kurt Vonnegut famously called semicolons “transvestite hermaphrodites representing absolutely nothing," adding that "all they do is show you’ve been to college"; now, The Oatmeal is choosing to ignore Vonnegut’s advice in an illustrated guide to using semicolons.

The Oatmeal—and proper punctuation—should be shared. explore-blog:

In admonishing against their usage, Kurt Vonnegut famously called semicolons “transvestite hermaphrodites representing absolutely nothing," adding that "all they do is show you’ve been to college"; now, The Oatmeal is choosing to ignore Vonnegut’s advice in an illustrated guide to using semicolons.

The Oatmeal—and proper punctuation—should be shared. explore-blog:

In admonishing against their usage, Kurt Vonnegut famously called semicolons “transvestite hermaphrodites representing absolutely nothing," adding that "all they do is show you’ve been to college"; now, The Oatmeal is choosing to ignore Vonnegut’s advice in an illustrated guide to using semicolons.

The Oatmeal—and proper punctuation—should be shared.

explore-blog:

In admonishing against their usage, Kurt Vonnegut famously called semicolons “transvestite hermaphrodites representing absolutely nothing," adding that "all they do is show you’ve been to college"; now, The Oatmeal is choosing to ignore Vonnegut’s advice in an illustrated guide to using semicolons.

The Oatmeal—and proper punctuation—should be shared.